2019 MacArthur Foundation Genius Fellows

There are twenty-six 2019 MacArthur Foundation Genius Fellows, featured below are a select few – two of whom I have had to pleasure to dialogue with at some point in time and one whose work directed me to important discoveries during my PhD research. Please click on their photos to find out more about them. My Congratulations to all of the 2019 MacArthur Fellows!! I believe in one way or another we are all better human being because of your courage and perseverance in sharing your gifts! Thank you.

Sujatha Baliga, 48, attorney and restorative justice practitioner
Walter Hood, 61, landscape and public artist
Kelly Lytle Hernández, 45, historian
Emmanuel Pratt, 42, urban designer, co-founder of Sweet Water Foundation
Saidiya Hartman, 58, literary scholar and cultural historian

Thoughts for Today

Poised To Ban Hair Discrimination

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Don’t Let Me Be Lonely

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57804/dont-let-me-be-lonely-cornel-west-makes-the-point

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Born in Jamaica in 1963, Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf Press, 2014), which received the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry. She served as a Chancellorof the Academy of American Poets from 2013 to 2018.

https://poets.org/poem/dont-let-me-be-lonely-there-was-time

https://poets.org/poem/we-heard-health-care-audio-only

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“Dancing in Blackness, A Memoir” wins the 2019 Selma Jeanne Cohen Prize in Dance Aesthetics

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The American Society for Aesthetics is pleased to announce the winner of the 2019 Selma Jeanne Cohen Prize in Dance Aesthetics, Dancing in Blackness: A Memoir, by Halifu Osumare, published by the University Press of Florida in 2018.

Dr. Halifu Osumare is Professor Emerita in the Department of African American and African Studies (AAS) at University of California, Davis, and was the Director of AAS from 2011-2014. She has been a dancer, choreographer, arts administrator, and scholar of black popular culture for over forty years. With a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, and an MA in Dance Ethnology from S.F. State University, she is also a protégé of the late renowned dancer-anthropologist Katherine Dunham and a Certified Instructor of Dunham Dance Technique.

She has been recognized as one of the foremost scholars of global hip-hop, publishing The Africanist Aesthetic in Global Hip-Hop: Power Moves in 2007 and, and The Hiplife in Ghana: West African Indigenization of Hip-Hop in 2012, after her 2008 Fulbright Fellowship at the University of Ghana, Legon. She has published numerous journal articles and book chapters on hip-hop, dance, and Katherine Dunham.

The prize was established in 2008 in memory of Selma Jeanne Cohen, and with enormous gratitude for her generous bequest to the ASA. The $1000 prize is awarded every year, for critical articles or books of distinction in dance aesthetics, dance theory, or the history of dance published in English.

Dr. Osumare will be presented with the prize at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Aesthetics in Phoenix October 9-12, 2019. She also will be honored at the annual Dance Scholars Breakfast at the meeting.

Read more here: https://aesthetics-online.org/news/458801/ASA-Announces-2019-Selma-Jeanne-Cohen-Prize-in-Dance-Aesthetics.htm

Time sensitive: Can you help this student? Read her story.

Meet Bri, she aspires to transform the world by working at the intersection of chemistry and computer science.   Click on her picture or the go-fund-me link below to read Bri’s story and contribute.

Brihttps://www.gofundme.com/help-bri-go-to-nyu?utm_medium=social&utm_source=whatsapp&utm_campaign=p_na+share-sheet&pc_code=wa_co_dashboard_a&rcid=f960f0734ee04d77bbdca135349b805a

Caster Semenya, Defiant After Race Win, Says She Won’t Take Hormone Reducing Drugs — TIME

Caster Semenya honors humanity with her determination to live, love, run, and delight in her body as her own self – maintaining and celebrating her body’s integrity !!! 

Caster Semenya was defiant in every way at what very well could be her last 800 meter race. Her raised fist at the start. Her unstoppable victory. And with her reply Friday to the big question of whether she will now submit to new testosterone regulations in track and field and take hormone-reducing medication. “Hell…

via Caster Semenya, Defiant After Race Win, Says She Won’t Take Hormone Reducing Drugs — TIME

I love this woman and her dynamic spirit in a time that tries to unhindered her from who she knows herself to be in this world

“I am a woman and I am fast”: what Caster Semenya’s story says about gender and race in sports

 

 

https://www.vox.com/identities/2019/5/3/18526723/caster-semenya-800-gender-race-intersex-athletes

Book Release Party – Kenrya Rankin +Akiba Solomon

Information on this page source from Colorlines Magazine, published by RaceForward

Fight WS

“The fact is, White supremacy defines our current reality. It is not merely a belief that to be White is to be better. It is a political, cultural and economic system premised on the subjugation of people who are not White. That subjugation takes on an infinite number of forms and is enforced with varying degrees of physical violence, mental abuse and robbery. White supremacy is the voice in our collective heads that says it makes civilized sense that one group of people gets to annihilate, enslave, incarcerate, brainwash, torture, sterilize, breed and terrorize other people. White supremacy establishes, upholds and normalizes hierarchy based on the premise that the less Black you are the closer you are to God.”

“[T]his is a book about freedom dreams. We’re well aware of the problems we’re buried beneath. We can feel the weight of them on our limbs, the heft of them in our abdomens as our second brains gnaw on the indignity of it all. But what does it look like for Black people to claw our way to fresh air? What does freedom feel like? How does it taste on the tongue? For some folks in this book, it feels like raising kids who gleefully take up space for themselves. For others, it looks like providing the tools we need to triumph over race-based trauma. There’s the pastor who envisions a day when following his radical, dark-skinned Jesus who always sides with the dispossessed will lift us out of this hole, and the organizer who can almost smell the sharp aroma of reforming the nation’s political system. And we can’t forget the professor who dreams of the day when we can bring our full selves to every table.”

Excerpted from “How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance” by Kenrya Rankin and Akiba Solomon, available now