Dancing Life… 5

Ayodele Casel’s Diary of a Tap Dancer explores shared themes of hoofers past and present with stories illuminating the struggle and joy of expression, communication, the evolution of jazz music, gender inequality, and the personal and culturally devastating implications for women of color. 

Tuesday, Feb 11, 2020 4:15 pm

Dancing Life 4

“…this short film explores the depths of Elisabeth’s practice and charts the ways in which she imbues traditional folklore and beliefs into her work – whether it be in dance, poetry or installation. “I think anybody that leaves home is looking for something. For me it was clarity,” she says.”

Sharing this link on the works of dancer, Elisabeth Sutherland Okyeame.

On Race and Health

Racial discrimination isn’t just harmful as it happens—its effects can linger for years. Tufts researchers recently found that people exposed to racial discrimination during early childhood were more likely to develop cardiovascular health issues compared to those who never experience discrimination, or who experienced discrimination later in life.

One of the most dynamic conversations taking place in and around fields of health and wellbeing is to what extent does racism contribute to the health and wellbeing of an individual across a lifetimes. For African living in the diaspora, and specifically in diaspora spaces largely constructed by colonial paradigms in place to protect and uphold white identity and whiteness through acts of physical and psychic assaults on black and brown bodies.

Researchers are gathering new evidence on the effects of experiences of racism and when along the life course these experiences are most detrimental. Read more below:

By Dominique Ameroso June 13, 2019 

“Racial discrimination isn’t just harmful as it happens—its effects can linger for years. Tufts researchers recently found that people exposed to racial discrimination during early childhood were more likely to develop cardiovascular health issues compared to those who never experience discrimination, or who experienced discrimination later in life.” Click to Read More!

Black, Homeless and Burdened

Peter Lynn, the longtime head of the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, said discrimination played a major role in the origins of the crisis. “There is a staggering overrepresentation of black people in homelessness, and that is not based on poverty,” he said. “That is based on structural and institutional racism.”

U.S. manufacturing of black homelessness and the destruction of lives: pervasive and relentless. As young children of six and seven, no one dreams of being homeless. This is one article that attempts to speak of the hearts of people that institutionalized systems are bent on destroying…

Dancing Life…2

It’s reminded me that religion is not just ideology; it’s culture. So when I visit my grandparents in Jamaica, I could say, “I’m not going to go to church with you on Sunday,” but that feels like it’s against the culture. It’s definitely made me see the importance of spiritual thinking (Kyle Marshall).

Thoughts of the Week

TONI MORRISION

Celebration of the Life of Toni Morrison at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine – Thursday, November 21, 20194:00 pm – 6:00 pm

MOMENTUM: A Race Forward Podcast

“In this episode of Momentum, Hiba and Chevon take on ‘cancel culture’ in the comedy world, discussing “Joker” director Todd Phillips recent comments about not being able to make comedy films because of “woke culture”, and Saturday Night Live’s recent hiring and firing of Shane Gillis. 

Race Forward’s Research Associate Yirssi, joins the conversation to talk about her work with “Shattered Families” around the intersection of immigration enforcement and the child welfare system, and gives us insight into the current state of the work and what she saw on her recent trip to Arizona and Mexico. “

LBD Peace Institute

Enacted in 2000, the annual Survivors of Homicide Victims Awareness Month (SHVAM) was created in an effort to educate the public and policymakers about the impact of murder on families and communities and uplift the peace-building efforts of survivors. Join us as we recognize and honor the survivorship of those in our community

William Augustus Hinton

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/portrait-pioneer

60 years after his death, groundbreaking bacteriologist Hinton honored at HMS

Excerpt

“Dr. Hinton understood what it meant to be black in America,” said Joan Reede, HMS dean for diversity and community partnership.

Hinton also understood that social and economic factors play a role in health and that disease often unduly afflicts the underprivileged, she said. 

Reede noted that not only did Hinton refuse scholarships designated for black students, preferring to compete and succeed academically on an equal footing with Harvard’s white students, but he also declined the 1938 NAACP Springarn Medal for achievement by an African American, concerned that his research might not be evaluated fairly if other scientists realized he was black.

For Colored Girls

“In Ntozake Shange’s celebrated feminist choreopoem, through Dec. 8 at the Public, seven women of color, named after and dressed in different hues of the rainbow, explore trauma and resilience through movement and text. Ms. Wailes’s performance is captivating for the ease in which she weaves Camille A. Brown’s choreography with American Sign Language.”